Reblog If You Haver Ever Used One of These Or Just Know What It Is

leader-of-standing-purgatorians:

reblogthings:

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It’s scares me that only 16,000 people know what this is

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Clothes are people’s extended skin, wheels extended feet, camera and telescope extended eyes. Out technological creations are extrapolations of the bodies that our genes build. In this way, we can think of technology as our extended body. If technology is an extension of humans, it is not an extension of our genes but our minds.

Technology is the exoskeleton of ideas.

Kevin Kelly (via inthenoosphere)
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Some see nature all ridicule and deformity…and some scarce see nature at all. But to the eyes of the man of imagination, nature is imagination itself.

William Blake (via inthenoosphere)
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Buddha introduced the idea that young people should become sannyasins. Then it is something significant. When a young person goes beyond sex, when a young person goes beyond desires, when a young person goes beyond greed, ambition, the longing to be powerful, the ambition to be famous, then it is something tremendously meaningful, significant.
Remember one thing: when you are young you have energies. Those energies can take you to hell and those same energies can take you to heaven. Energies are neutral; it depends on you how you use them.

OSHO

The Dhammapada: The Way of the Buddha, Vol VIII

Chapter XII: Rivers don’t exist

1 January 1980 am in Buddha Hall

(via seedsofwisdom)

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The blurring of the divide between the three great monotheistic faiths was a feature of one of the fastest-growing religious movements of the 17th and 18th century Balkans - the strain of Islamic mysticism known as Bektashism. Bektashi doctrine, counterposed to the formal hierarchies of Sunni Islam, asserted that, ‘A saint belongs to the whole world.’ According to a late 19th century pamphlet, ‘The Bektashi believe in the Great Lord and in the true saints Mohammed Ali, Kadije, Fatima, and Hasan and Husain… They also believe in all the saints, both ancient and modern, because they believe in Good and worship it. And as they believe in these and love them, so also do they in Moses and Miriam and Jesus and their servants.’ The Bektashi adopted Christian saints’ shrines and renamed them after their own; other sites which genuinely were founded by the Bektashi were visited by Christians as sanctuaries of their saints. In such a setting, religious boundaries dissolved easily. ‘I thought you were all Moslems here,’ a British traveller asked the priests at one Bektashi tekke (a hole shrine). ‘So we are,’ they told her, ‘but of course we keep Saint George’s Day.’ Linked for centuries to the slave converts at the Ottoman court, Bektashism spread throughout southeastern Europe with the empire and became popular in much of southern Albania, where it remains entrenched even after the fall of communism.

Mark Mazower, The Balkans: From the End of Byzantium to the Present Day (via solipsistictendencies)
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